Bargain Megalodon Teeth

A Typical Day in the Life of a Megalodon Shark Tooth Hunter

To find amazing teeth, you have to do things most people wouldn’t do. Like sit on a river bottom with no visibility for a few hours every day, EVERY DAY, 12 months out of the year. Some days are amazing and you come across the find of a lifetime like the recent Mastodon jawbone we came across a few months ago, but most days are just about finding teeth in whatever shape you come across. This is a pretty typical day for capt Gene and Bill Eberlein of Megateeth.com.

 

Do You Restore Megalodon Teeth?

One of the most common questions about our teeth is “are they restored or natural?” Here’s a video explaining a few different types of restorations and what to look for when buying megalodon shark teeth.

SPOILER ALERT: Megateeth Fossils DOES NOT SELL restored teeth, nor do we provide the service. If a tooth is polished it will be clearly marked in the product description. Learn more in the video.

Shark Week Megalodon Tooth Giveaway

Be sure to enter our Megalodon Shark Tooth Giveaway on Facebook. Happy Shark Week!

Sometimes I Find Broken Megalodon Teeth

When diving we sometimes find broken megalodon teeth, with the most common being a vertical break right down the middle. Check out some of these teeth found in the coastal rivers near Savannah, Georgia, one of them is pretty cool with a neat story.

Video Article by Richmond Hill Reflections

A video done a while back by a local magazine, Richmond Hill Reflections on Bill.

Video of Mastodon Jawbone, Teeth, and Gomphotherium Teeth

You’ve seen the pics of the mastodon jawbone but wanted to make a video and discuss it a little more, as well as take a look at another kind of elephant type animal that lived in North America and right here in Georgia the gomphotherium. It really is one of the most amazing fossils I’ve come across diving.

The mastodon jaw has been featured all over our local news in Savannah, Georgia including a television segment on the news with WTOC and even a cartoon drawing of the photo of me holding the jaw in our local Savannah Morning News paper.

Giant Mastodon Jaw Found by Local Diver – Savannah Morning News- Savannah Now

Local shark teeth diver Bill Eberlein experienced a first in his lifetime when he recently found a mastodon jaw embedded in the mud at the bottom of the Intracoastal Waterway near Richmond Hill recently.

“I have been diving in coastal Georgia rivers for over 15 years for prehistoric shark teeth, but this is the first time I have discovered a mastodon jaw,” Eberlein said.

“Mastodons roamed North America during the Ice Age, and it is believed that they last roamed what is now the southern U.S.A. 75,000 years ago and finally became extinct throughout the continent 10,000 years ago,” he said. “They were sturdy elephant-like animals about 9 feet high at the shoulder and weighing between 4 and 5 tons.”

Eberlein, a south Bryan County resident, is a professional diver who finds prehistoric teeth from sharks who went extinct more than 2 million years ago in the muddy waters of coastal Georgia — where there is normally zero to 3 inches of visibility.  A former teacher turned entrepreneur, he got hooked on diving 25 years ago and now spends his days diving for ancient megalodon shark teeth, which can be up to 6 inches long.

“I was doing my normal dive when I felt what I thought was a fossilized log, but when I felt the molars I knew I had found something very rare,” he said, talking about his mastodon discovery. “I have found individual mastodon teeth occasionally in the past, but this is very exciting. It was really heavy to bring to the surface after I dug it out of the mud and weighs about 60 pounds.”

Eberline was diving in about 45 feet of water when he found the mastodon jaw.

For more information and photos of fossils, go to www.megateeth.com .

 

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Ever Hear Of A Gomphotherium?

After finding a few mastodon teeth and half of a mastodon jaw recently, it was kind of neat to come across this Gomphotherium tooth. They had 4 tusks! Will have to do a longer video on this guy soon.

 

Giant Mastodon Jaw Fragment with Two Molars.

From my dive today. I found it upside down and thought it was a big piece of petrified wood. I dug it out and turned it over to find it was a section from a Giant Mastodon jaw. It still has both molars.  This is one of the coolest things I have found.

 

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The Day of the Dolphin in Savannah.

A few years ago my parents visited and we spent the day on the boat and at the beach.  We had lots of visitors.

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Going down a local River.

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The day on a deserted beach!!!

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Looking for Handouts.

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How To Find Shark Teeth – Pictorial Guide.

What you need to find Megalodon Teeth..

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…SCUBA Tanks with lots of air…

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…Water full of Fossils (we hope)…

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Buoyancy Compensation Device (BCD)

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Regulator, Knife (To ward off modern hungry sharks), Gauges

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Compass, even though you can’t see it.

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Bright Dive Light.

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Equipment ready to go

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Drysuit (Cold Water)

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Fins for kicking in strong current.

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Tight sealed hood.

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High Tech Dive Gloves from the Walmart Paint department

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Mask and helmet to hold the dive light.

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Ready

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Set

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Gone..blub.blub..

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Back.  Bright sun is blinding after 90 minutes in the dark.

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Nicer Finds

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Smal broken and misc fossils.

 

 

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Whale verts and mandibles.

 

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Who is this guy?  He showed up after I was done and wanted to dive.

 

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I will let him sit on the boat for a few minutes.

 

 

 

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2009 Tampa Fossil Fest

I asked everyone’s permission before taking these photos, but if someone wants me to remove any of these, no problem. Just send me an e-mail at bill@megateeth.com.

I did not include photos of the club member’s collections that were on display because I could not ask permission. They were something to see. If you were not at the show, you should try to attend next year. It was a great time.

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2010 Tampa Fossil Fest

Once again the Tampa Fossil Fest was one of the nicest fossil shows of the year. Many of the dealer displays were similar to last year so I focused on the member collections when taking photos this year.These collections are amazing. These photos do not do them justice and to really appreciate them you need to see them in person. You just have to be there.

 

Michael Searle, Tamps Fossil Club President said I should feel free to post photos of the member collection displays. If anyone does not want photos of their display posted online feel free to e-mail me at bill@megateeth.com and I will remove it asap.

 

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My friends Mike and Zsuzsanna took photos of a recent dive.

Photos from a recent dive. Thanks Mike and Zsuzsanna for the great photos an1  2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 32 33 34 3535 34 33 32 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1d visit.

Coastal Courrier . People and Interests.


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By Lauren Hunsberger

Staff writer
Updated: July 8, 2009 10:31 a.m.
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Name: Bill Eberlein

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Occupation: Instructor at Savannah Tech and Premier Systems and Training, Inc. in Savannah

Hobby: Fossil hunting — specifically, megalodon teeth, fossils that experts date back two million years ago.

How did you get started diving for fossils in South Georgia? “I started diving 25 years ago in Erie, Pa., and we used to dive Lake Erie for ship wrecks. In 1999 I was hired by Gulfstream in the IT department and came down here thinking I would be diving in the ocean. Then I met a guy who was an engineer at Gulfstream who said he dove for shark teeth in the rivers. The first thing I thought was, ‘Sharks’ teeth in the rivers?’ And then I was thinking like the little tiny sharks’ teeth, but he brought one [a megalodon tooth] in and I thought, ‘I’d like to find one of those.’ Then I went out and got hooked on it.”

What exactly is a megalodon shark? “It’s a shark that was about 70 feet long and they say that the megalodon shark was probably the size of a large whale today. So think of what a large whale is like, and imagine it’s a shark.”

What did they eat? “They think they ate giant sperm whales.”

When you’re underwater in the rivers around here, where the visibility is low, how do you distinguish a fossil or tooth from a rock or piece of wood when you can’t see it? “I’ve been doing this for years and, like today, I was digging real deep into the mud, and if I just touch a root (of a tooth) I know that shape instinctively. I wear gloves a little thicker than yellow dishwashing gloves and as soon as you touch a blade with that enamel, it’s so slick compared to everything else down there … I’ve found thousands of these over the years so you just know the feel of them.”

Is it scary diving in the depths of the murky water? “There are times where you get a little apprehensive. The thing that always scared me more than anything else, it’s not the sharks or the alligators, it’s the sting rays because they’re down there, buried. So you grab hold of one and all of a sudden, it comes out fluttering up and you see their tails flipping around and even if they hit you in the arm, it’s so painful and the bacteria could get in there.”

You dive mainly in local rivers. What are some of your favorite spots for finding teeth? “You know it’s funny because the whole area is covered. If you can get down 40 feet, the whole area is covered with the fossils. So you tend to just move around a lot. There are some real nice spots near Richmond Hill. There are some spots down here in Liberty County. Just for convenience sake, I dive in both areas. So, there’s not one spot in particular. There are some near the Intercoastal and near St. Catherines, too.”

Are people amazed when you tell them you find fossils from 2 million years ago in local rivers? “Yeah, they are. And in fact, I go to this dive shop in Savannah and for the first two years, a few of the divers would laugh and they’d go, ‘Wait a minute, you dive in the rivers for shark’s teeth?’ But it’s just so much fun. But yeah, people are amazed.”

Is there a pretty large group of people who collect these? “Yeah. If you go on eBay there will be hundreds for sale. I’ve sent teeth to people all over Europe and Japan, China and Taiwan. I just sent one to Malta. I still don’t know where that country is.”

Do you have any advice for anyone who is interested in doing this as a hobby? “The diving is a little tricky. I was diving 15 years before I started doing this. I was trained in Pennsylvania with a search and recovery team with the sheriff’s department. It’s tricky because you’re doing all things you normally shouldn’t be doing. You’re diving in bad visibility, you’re diving in strong currents and you’re diving alone … so there’re a lot of hazards.
“I guess my advice for someone who really wants to do this is to get really comfortable diving to the point where you know all your gear without seeing it. There’re a lot of times when I can’t even see my air gauge to see how much air I have left.”

Among other fossils collections, you also have a large collection of pectin shells. What is the significance of the shells? “They’re 2 million years old and they’re just scallop-type shells. You don’t find them all over. There are about three spots where you can find these and they’re mixed in with the sharks’ teeth. So, when you start thinking about the layers of the Earth, they find these shells in the same layers where the sharks’ teeth are, so that’s how they date them.”

To see a collection of Bill Eberlein’s megalodon’s teeth, visit The Plunder Box  in the IGA Plaza at 192 Butler Ave. Midway GA.

or go to www.megateeth.com.

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